About Those 100

Readers sound off on our cover story.


Published:

About Those 100

An excellent list, “[The 100 Most Influential East Bay Residents of All Time,” July] and I’m sure you’re hearing from some names who should’ve been included. Joseph “Pepper” Gomez lived most of his entire life in Alameda on Central and was a true trailblazer in sports entertainment. While he was a global multiple world champion singles and tag team pro wrestling champion after graduating from L.A. City College, double-majoring in sports and economics, he was the first Hispanic-American superstar in that genre. … He was a real and decorated amateur athlete first and foremost.

The East Bay’s equally honored Amy Trask was the longtime CEO of our Oakland Raiders, working in nearly every department there under owner Al Davis and known as his unofficial right hand.

—Michael Lano

 

Political Island

I do not think it is appropriate for a local magazine wishing to promote local businesses to express negative political views, whilst also leading readers to believe it is the thoughts of all Alamedans [“Not Your Grandfather’s Island,” July] Your opinion is your opinion, and you are welcome to it, but maybe if the loudmouths of the world could be a bit more positive, we might get something good accomplished for all. I wonder if all those paid advertisers are of the same opinion!

—Donald Bertucio

 

Toxic Materials

I was horrified and dismayed to see your ode to various forms of backyard cooking using wood [“Perfectly Provisioning Your Outdoor Kitchen,” July]. Wood smoke contains the exact same cancer-causing chemicals as second-hand cigarette smoke, delivered as smaller particulate matter, which penetrates deeper into the lungs. Cooking with wood also leaves cancer-causing chemicals on the food prepared in this manner. And, perhaps, most critically, neighbors are being exposed to toxic wood smoke pollution.

—Noelle Robbins

 

Correction

Our July news story, “How to Green the Island,” incorrectly stated that Alameda Municipal Power used state energy credit proceeds to finance ferries and vehicles. The story also erroneously said AMP is considering “solar power on schools, community centers, and new development.” Finally, the story included percentages of AMP’s current energy mix and its plans for its energy mix by 2020 that, based on follow-up reporting, could not be verified.

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